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Thomson House School

Thomson House School

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Approach

Prevent

Prevent

What is radicalisation?

It is when a person starts to support terrorism or forms of extremism that leads to terrorism.

  • They are usually 13 years old or upwards but not always.
  • They may have a personality or identity crisis.
  • They may have unmet aspirations or have a personal crisis.
  • They may have a need for adventure or excitement.
  • They may feel that their culture or religion is under threat.
  • Individuals may feel socially isolated or suffering depression.
  • They may demonstrate criminal behaviour.
  • They may be groomed by others who promise them excitement, glory or freedom.

What are the signs?

  • Overly sensitive about online viewing.
  • Feeling isolated or expressions of “us and them” mentality.
  • Becoming more argumentative or domineering in their viewpoint – quick to condemn those who disagree with their opinions.
  • Downloading extremism content.
  • Social isolation – especially if they had been social previously.
  • Abnormal routines or travel patterns.
  • Altered appearance.

Thomson House School uses the following accepted Governmental definition of extremism which is: 

‘Vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs; and/or calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas’.

There is no place for extremist views of any kind in our school, whether from internal sources – pupils, staff or governors, or external sources - school community, external agencies or individuals. Our pupils see our school as a safe place where they can explore controversial issues safely and where our teachers encourage and facilitate this – we have a duty to ensure this happens. 

As a school we recognise that extremism and exposure to extremist materials and influences can lead to poor outcomes for children and so should be addressed as a safeguarding concern as set out in this policy. We also recognise that if we fail to challenge extremist views we are failing to protect our pupils. Extremists of all persuasions aim to develop destructive relationships between different communities by promoting division, fear and mistrust of others based on ignorance or prejudice and thereby limiting the life chances of young people. Education is a powerful weapon against this; equipping young people with the knowledge, skills and critical thinking, to challenge and debate in an informed way. 

Therefore, at Thomson House School we will provide a broad and balanced curriculum, delivered by skilled professionals, so that our pupils are enriched, understand and become tolerant of difference and diversity and also to ensure that they thrive, feel valued and not marginalized.   

Furthermore at Thomson House School we are aware that children and young people can be exposed to extremist influences or prejudiced views from an early age which emanate from a variety of sources and media, including via the internet, and at times pupils may themselves reflect or display views that may be discriminatory, prejudiced or extremist, including using derogatory language.   

Any prejudice, discrimination or extremist views, including derogatory language, displayed by pupils or staff will always be challenged and where appropriate dealt with in line with our Behaviour Policy for pupils and Code of Conduct for staff.   

THS Preventing Extremism Policy